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EETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 325

MOTION: Councillor P. Gogarty

That the following Specific Local Objective be enshrined in the South Dublin County Council Draft Development Plan:

SLO – Liffey Valley – Amenity

Provide for the amenity development of the Liffey Valley, including securing control (through purchase, CPO or lease) over any lands or strategic buildings in the area which may come up for sale north of the N4/M4, from the County boundary with Dublin City Council, right up to the Kildare border, especially including lands covered by the SAAO; with a view to the development of a Regional Park with public access to the banks of the River Liffey. These would potentially include areas beside Waterstown Park and adjacent to Farmleigh Bridge, the Mill in Palmerstown, Coates lands, St Edmundsbury/Woodville, the Italian embassy grounds etc.

Co-sponsored by Cllrs Guss O’Connell, Liona O’Toole, Francis Timmons

REPORT:

The acquisition of privately owned lands is beyond the strategic land use function of the County Development Plan. The proposed motion therefore cannot be achieved through the Development Plan.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is not adopted.

 

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 322

MOTION: Councillor G. O’Connell

The following Objective to be inserted in the 2016 – 2022 County Development Plan ref 6.4.2 (P 109) TM Policy 5 and Policy 6, given the residential character of the area, the density and design of the estates and the fact that the named roads were all build prior to the 1963 Planning Act and that the level of motorised traffic on these roads has reached dangerous and intolerable levels: All vehicles in excess of 3.5 Tonne will be restricted, except for access, from entering Kennelsfort Road, Wheatfield Road, Palmerstown Avenue, Turret Road, Woodfarm Avenue, Woodfarm Drive, Glenmaroon Road and the Oval, Palmerstown.

Co-signed by Cllr. P. Gogarty, Cllr. L. O’Toole, Cllr. F. Timmons and Cllr. D. O’Donovan.

REPORT:

Restrictions on HGV traffic for vehicles over 7.5 tonnes have been put in place along Kennelsfort Road. This is sufficient to prevent Heavy Goods vehicles using the road (unless they have business in the area) because of their size whilst still permitting smaller commercial vehicles to traverse the route. The 7.5 tonne restriction was applied in accordance with South Dublin County Council’s Mobility and Management of Heavy Goods Vehicles policy.

There is concern that the inclusion of the requirement for a 3.5 tonne limit would place unreasonable restrictions on the use of the road that would impact on the viability of business that utilise it for access, particular those within the Cherry Orchard Industrial Estate. The restriction may also result in the dispersion of additional HGV traffic within the Ballyfermot and Lucan areas, as alternative routes are sought. The proposed 3.5 tonne limit also conflicts with South Dublin County Council policy.

Furthemore, road weight restrictions are beyond the strategic land use remit of the County Development Plan. The proposed motion therefore cannot be achieved through the Development Plan.

It should also be noted that it is proposed to rezone part of the Cherry Orchard Industrial Estate for Mixed Use. Should this Brownfield area regenerate in the medium to long term, HGV access may no longer be necessary.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is not adopted.

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 316

MOTION: Councillor F. Timmons

“That SDCC supports a geothermal pilot project in Newcastle’’

REPORT:

The South Dublin Spatial Energy Demand Analysis (SEDA) has been undertaken to inform the policies and objectives contained in Chapter 10 Energy and the development standards contained in Chapter 11 Implementation of the draft County Development Plan. The SEDA includes an analysis of heat density across the County, stemming from all heating requirements across the residential, commercial and municipal sectors. The SEDA has identified ten district heating Areas of Potential, six of which are located in Tallaght town centre. The Areas of Potential demonstrate a heat density in excess of 250 TJ / KM2.

Section 10.2.4 of the Draft Development Plan relates to Low Carbon District Heating Networks, such as that proposed to be development as a pilot project in Newcastle and states ‘District heating networks can be based on a variety of technologies and renewable energy sources, such as combined heat and power (CHP), biomass energy, geothermal or energy from waste. These schemes are particularly viable in built up areas, such as town centres, where there is sufficient heat demand and heat load diversity, including ‘anchor’ loads i.e. buildings with a high or even twenty-four hour heat demand. Such a mixed energy profile makes local district heating networks more economically viable and can result in reduced heat losses’.

Energy Policy 6 Low Carbon District Heating Networks supports the development of district heating networks across the County, which could include Newcastle. With regard to geothermal Energy Policy 6 states:

Energy (E) Policy 6 Low Carbon District Heating Networks

(ii) It is the policy of the Council to support the development of both deep and shallow geothermal energy sources throughout the County. Deep geothermal projects are particularly suited to areas demonstrating high heat densities.

E6 Objective 4:To support deep and shallow geothermal projects at appropriate locations across South Dublin County and in accordance with the South Dublin Spatial Energy Demand Analysis (SEDA).

To prescribe the development of a specific geothermal pilot project in Newcastle would be prioritising an area where sufficient heat densities have not been highlighted and would not accord with the Countywide heat density analysis undertaken as part of the South Dublin Spatial Energy Demand Analysis.

The development of a geothermal energy project in South Dublin County may include Newcastle, but evidence from the Countywide analysis, undertaken as part the South Dublin Spatial Energy Demand Analysis, does not support the case for a pilot geothermal project specific to Newcastle in preference to other locations in the County.

Recommendation

It is recommended that the motion is not adopted.

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 315

MOTION: Councillor F.N. Duffy

Page 160 10.1 Energy –

Include additional E2 Objective 5:

Identify existing public rights of way and walking routes and prohibit development which would interfere with them or with access to the countryside or recreational amenity.

Co-signed by Cllrs Paul Gogarty, Deirdre O’Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Dermot Richardson, Francis Timmons, Liona O’Toole, Ronan McMahon & Dermot Looney

REPORT:

Energy Policy E2 relates to the implementation of the recommendations of the South Dublin Spatial Energy Demand Analysis (SEDA). The SEDA analyses and maps energy information across sectors in South Dublin County, including heat density, energy demand and costs across sectors. The SEDA contains a number of key findings including priority areas for district heating, clusters of high energy users in the commercial sector and identifies opportunities to lower fossil fuel use and use renewable energy alternatives. It is recognised that the measures listed in the South Dublin SEDA should be carried out in accordance with environmental safeguards and the protection of natural and built heritage features, including walking routes and associated amenities, including views and prospects.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted with amendment and the following objective is added under Energy Policy 2:

‘To ensure that the recommendations of the South Dublin SEDA are carried out in accordance with environmental safeguards and the protection of natural or built heritage features, biodiversity and views and prospects’

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 314

MOTION: Councillor F.N. Duffy

Page 216 – 11.7.2 Energy Performance in New Buildings

Add to end of section –

To support and promote the use of CEM III/a cement classification. The use of green building methods such as BREEAM and LEED ensures a whole life cycle approach to building design including operational carbon and embodied carbon. This holistic approach results in low energy demand buildings with a significantly reduced carbon footprint and a higher commercial value.

Co-signed by Paul Gogarty, Deirdre O’Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Dermot Richardson, Francis Timmons & Dermot Looney

REPORT:

CEM III/a relates to blast-furnance cement classification; this matter is adequately addressed in the Building Regulations Part A (2012) Structures and as such is not relevant to the Development Plan.

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology) is an international environmental assessment method for buildings and aims to improve the environmental performance of buildings and improve the internal living standard for occupants.

LEED (Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design) is an internationally recognised certification programme for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED addresses a range of themes including: energy use, carbon emissions, water use and solid waste.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted with amendment and the following text to be included at the end of Section 11.7.2 Energy Performance in New Buildings:

‘Development proposals for new buildings should have regard to BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology) and LEED (Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design), which aim to improve the environmental performance of buildings across a range of themes, incorporating the design, construction and operation phases of a building life cycle’.

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 45217

MOTION: Councillor P. Gogarty

Amend Energy (E) Policy 10 Small Scale Wind Energy Schemes to read:

It is Council policy to encourage small to medium-scale wind energy developments within industrial or business parks, and support small community-based proposals in urban areas provided they do not negatively impact upon the environmental quality, and visual or residential amenities of the area.

Co sponsored by Liona O’Toole, Deirdre O Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Francis Timmons, Francis Noel Duffy, Dermot Looney

REPORT:

Small scale wind turbines are classified in the context of those used in the domestic and commercial sense for on site energy use (also known as auto-production). Under existing planning exemptions provided for under the Planning and Development Regulations 2007 and 2008, wind turbines with an overall height of 13 metres are allowable in the domestic case and 20 metres in the commercial case. There are also specific requirements relating to distances from boundaries, overhead cables and electricity distribution lines.

In Ireland, grid connection rules state that a wind turbine used for auto-production purposes, can supply power back to the National Grid up to a limit of 500kW. Such ‘medium scale’ wind turbines that could cater for both on-site consumption and feeding a proportion of energy produced back onto the national grid vary in height, depending on site location and available wind speeds, but could reach a standard total height of between approximately 50 and 70 metres in total height. Figure 1 attached shows the varying height of typical wind turbines relative to the amount of energy produced. The height of the turbines is shown relative to the height of Liberty Hall, Dublin, which is approximately 59 metres in height.

The intention of the motion is accepted, medium scale wind turbines of between approximately 50 – 70 metres in total height and capable of generating 500kW installed capacity (as shown on Figure 1), could be considered in industrial and business parks. However, such medium scale wind turbines would require an adequate ‘falling height’ which would require careful consideration, given the layout and design of existing industrial and business parks across South Dublin County, together with other planning, aviation and environmental constraints that may exist.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 312

MOTION: Councillor P. Gogarty

On page 169 10.2.8, Amend first paragraph to read: The Council will encourage small to medium scale wind energy developments in industrial and business parksand small scale developments for domestic purposes, in appropriate locations to serve on-site energy use (auto-consumption) and feedback of surplus to the grid. The Council recognises advances in technologies in this area and the potential for such development to be designed to suitably integrate with the built fabric of these areas. There has been Government support for this since 2007, as set out in the various planning exemptions provided for under the Planning and Development Regulations 2007 and 2008.

Co sponsored by Liona O’Toole, Deirdre O Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Francis Timmons, Francis Noel Duffy, Dermot Looney

REPORT:

Small scale wind turbines are classified in the context of those used in the domestic and commercial sense for on site energy use (also known as auto-production). Under existing planning exemptions provided for under the Planning and Development Regulations 2007 and 2008, wind turbines with an overall height of 13 metres are allowable in the domestic case and 20 metres in the commercial case. There are also specific requirements relating to distances from boundaries, overhead cables and electricity distribution lines.

In Ireland, grid connection rules state that a wind turbine used for auto-production purposes, can supply power back to the National Grid up to a limit of 500kW. Such ‘medium scale’ wind turbines that could cater for both on-site consumption and feeding a proportion of energy produced back onto the national grid vary in height, depending on site location and available wind speeds, but could reach a standard total height of between approximately 50 and 70 metres in total height. Figure 1 attached shows the varying height of typical wind turbines relative to the amount of energy produced. The height of the turbines is shown relative to the height of Liberty Hall, Dublin, which is approximately 59 metres in height.

The intention of the motion is accepted, medium scale wind turbines of between approximately 50 – 70 metres in total height and capable of generating 500kW installed capacity (as shown on Figure 1), could be considered in industrial and business parks. However, such medium scale wind turbines would require an adequate ‘falling height’ which would require careful consideration, given the layout and design of existing industrial and business parks across South Dublin County, together with other planning, aviation and environmental constraints that may exist.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 305

MOTION: Councillor F.N. Duffy

Page 153 – 9.4.0

The last sentence of the 1st paragraph should be deleted and replaced by: 

Identify the existing public rights of way which give access to mountains, lakeshores, riverbanks or other places of natural beauty or recreational activity which the Council have maintained or repaired with a view to identifying public rights of way, endeavoring to verify and list the public rights of way and begin the formal process for designating rights of way under Section 14 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended).

Co-signed by Cllrs Paul Gogarty, Deirdre O’Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Dermot Richardson, Francis Timmons, Liona O’Toole, Ronan McMahon & Dermot Looney

REPORT:

In accordance with the provisions of Planning and Development Legislation, HCL 16 Objective 1 of the Draft Development Plan seeks to preserve and map public rights of way as they come to the attention of the Council. Where a planning authority proposes to include the preservation of a specific public right of way in a development plan, notice must be given to the owner or occupier of the lands who has a right of appeal to the Circuit Court. It is advised that the identification of a public right of way requires proof or verification of the right of way.

The proposed replacement text fails to take cognisance of the fact that identifying a public right of way can encounter complex and lengthy legal proceedings. No public rights of way have heretofore been brought to the attention of the Planning Authority for investigation.

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is not adopted.

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 304

MOTION: Councillor F.N. Duffy

Page 156 – 9.7.0  Sites of Geological Interest

Include an additional HCL Objective 2:

Encourage, promote, facilitate and support access and public rights of way to geological and geo-morphological features of heritage value and co-ordinate the continuing development of strategic walking routes, trails and other recreational activities in geo parks.

Co-signed by Cllrs  Paul Gogarty, Deirdre O’Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Dermot Richardson, Francis Timmons, Liona O’Toole, Ronan McMahon & Dermot Looney

REPORT:

HCL 16 Objective 1 (page 154) of the Draft Development Plan relates to the preservation and mapping of public rights of way. In order to avoid repetition it is recommended that HCL 16 Objective 1 be amended to include reference to parklands, geological and geo-morphical features of heritage value.

 

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted with amendment.

Include parklands, geological and geo-morphical features of heritage value as examples of places of natural beauty or recreational value under HCL 16 Objective 1 (Public Rights of Way).

MEETING OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN MEETING

Thursday, June 18, 2015

MOTION NO. 303

MOTION: Councillor F.N. Duffy

Page 100 Included in Actions –

> Continue to develop Sli na Slainte walking routes in consultation with community groups.

>  New Walkways and Cycleways will be established on a legal and permanent basis and will be sign/posted/waymarked.

>  Encourage, promote, provide and facilitate access to forestry and woodlands, including private forestry, in co-operation with Coillte, the Forest Service and other agencies, for walking routes (including long distance and looped walks), mountain trails, nature trails, mountain bike trails, bridle paths, hiking, orienteering and other non-noise generating recreational activities for the benefit of local people and tourists and take into account the Forest Service 2006 publication “Forest Recreation Guide for Owners and Managers”.

>  Recognising the importance and potential of walking and cycling from a local as well as a tourism perspective, create, provide, promote, improve, develop, protect, sustain, support, enhance, encourage and facilitate the creation of a high quality dedicated network of cycling/walking routes and tourist trails(including looped walks, local walks, community walks and medium/long distance walks) and public/rural footpaths, in rural areas (including suitable linear lands along  established rights of way, strategic green corridors and other off-road routes). Ensure that these routes are, where possible, free of vehicular traffic and are well-marked and maintained and are convenient, safe and pleasant. Enhance and extend existing routes, by utilising links from residential areas through parks and open spaces to facilitate a secure, safe green network and linking with Sli na Slainte and existing or new public rights of way, to provide access to scenic, mountain, lakeshore and river features and views of special interest, particularly where these have a historical association and to open up diverse landscape. Create more people friendly places,walking/cycling routes should be designed to incorporate current thinking and best practice from experience in other locations. Off-road walkways can be established by informal, formal agreements with landowners or by acquisition.

>  Reserve land adjacent to river and canal banks and lakeshores to facilitate walking/cycling routes and other recreational activities and to act as buffer zones between new developments and river corridors and other water bodies.

>  Recognizing the role played by natural amenities and landscape, as part of our heritage and as a major resource both for visitors and local people, provide, support, maintain, promote, encourage, protect, preserve, improve, safeguard, facilitate and enhance public access to our natural heritage including mountains, commonage and other hill land, moorlands, forests, rivers, lakes, valleys, 2000 Natura sites, nature reserves, other natural amenities and to the countryside generally by creating a meaningful network of access routes as the opportunity or need arises. Consider appropriate rural recreational and tourism related developments which would facilitate public access to sensitive landscapes. This will be done in co-operation with state agencies, other interested bodies and local community groups.

>  Recognising the importance of archaeology and National Monuments as part of our heritage and inheritance, provide, promote, enhance, facilitate, encourage, support, and protect public access to archaeological sites National monuments, battlefields historic burial grounds and graveyards and sites of historic interest, in direct ownership, guardianship  or control of the Council and/or the State  or private ownership. Appropriate signage will be put in place. Information on access to sites will be made be available on the Council’s web-site.(Insert address).

>  Protect, preserve, improve  and maintain existing publicrights of way to  archaeological sites and designate  traditional walking routes as public rights of way and in other cases, routes will be acquired by agreement with landowners or by way of compulsory powers.

>  Applications for new development for aggregate extraction, processing and associated processes, shall identify existing public rights of way and walking routes which may be impacted on are adjacent to the development site. They shall be kept free from development as Rights of Way/Walking Routes. Ensure that tourist, natural or recreational amenities will not be materially affected

>  It is the policy of the Council to enter into immediate negotiations with the Forest Service to take over the management and/or ownership of Massy Woods.

>  Encourage, promote, provide and facilitate access to forestry and woodlands, including private forestry, in co-operation with Coillte, the Forest Service and other agencies, for walking routes (including long distance and looped walks), mountain trails, nature trails, mountain bike trails, bridle paths, hiking, orienteering and other non-noise generating recreational activities for the benefit of local people and tourists and take into account the Forest Service 2006 publication “Forest Recreation Guide for Owners and Managers”.

Co-signed by Cllrs  Paul Gogarty, Deirdre O’Donovan, Guss O’Connell, Dermot Richardson, Francis Timmons & Dermot Looney

REPORT:

The issues raised in the motion relate to a number of issues including heritage, tourism and biodiversity issues that are already covered under various chapters of the Draft County Development Plan and are not directly relevant to Chapter 6 Transport and Mobility. Responses to the various aspects of the motion are set out under sub headings below.

Sli na Sláinte Routes:

Sli na Sláinte walking routes are identified under a nationwide partnership that is supported by the HSE and Irish Sports Council and largely relates to the sign posting of existing routes. The further signposting and identification of such routes is beyond the strategic land use function of the County Development Plan.

Public Rights of Way:

In accordance with the provisions of Planning and Development Legislation, HCL 16 Objective 1 of the Draft Development Plan seeks to preserve and map public rights of way as they come to the attention of the Council. When this occurs, notice must be given to the owner or occupier of the lands who has a right of appeal to the Circuit Court. There is no other basis to establish legal and permanent routes under Planning and Development Legislation.

Access Routes and Permissive Paths:

HCL 16 Objective 2 of the Draft County Development Plan seeks to promote and facilitate the creation of Permissive Access Routes and heritage trails that will provide access to (inter alia) forestry, woodlands, waterways, rural areas, upland/mountain areas and between historic villages in partnership with landowners, semi-state and other public bodies. This objective could be amended to include Coilte and the Forest Service as examples of such bodies.

HCL 16 Objective 3 seeks to promote and facilitate the continued development of the Dublin Mountains Way in association with the Dublin Mountains Partnership particularly routes that provide access to regional and local networks of walking, running , hiking and mountain bike trails and other recreational facilities. This objective could be amended to encourage the routing of new trails and rerouting of existing trails off public roads.

Access and Protection of Watercourses:

GI2 Objective 12 of the Draft Plan provides for a minimum biodiversity protection zone of 10 metres from all watercourses in the County with the full extent of the protection zone to be determined during the consideration of green routes and trails.

Access to Historic Sites:

HCL 16 Objective 4 seeks to promote and improves access, in partnership with the relevant landowners, to all the historic sites in the County and seek to maximise their tourism potential in partnership with the relevant landowners.

Ownership of Lands:

The acquisition of lands is beyond the strategic land use function of the County Development Plan.

 

Recommendation

It is recommended that this motion is adopted with amendment.

Amend HCL 16 Objective 2 (Permissive Access Routes) to include Coillte and the Forest Service as examples of land owners and semi-state bodies that Permissive Access Routes could be developed in partnership with.

Amend HCL 16 Objective 3 (Dublin Mountains Way) to encourage the routing of new trails and rerouting of existing trails off public roads.